Flavorful Oven-Slow-Cooked BBQ Ribs


I love a rack of barbecue ribs, but it’s one of the few dishes I’m particular about if ordering it at a restaurant. Are they meaty enough? Will I like the rub or sauce? Are they expensive?

It’s been on my mind for months that I could take the guesswork out of enjoying ribs by just making my own at home. And while I could transform my simple charcoal grill into a smoker, I’ve really wanted to come up with a delicious, simple recipe to cook the ribs slowly in the oven. I’ll grill in any season or weather possible, but sometimes it’s actually much easier to use the oven.

After doing some research online and doing a bit of experimenting with our spice rack and fridge compartments, I’ve created a recipe that I’m very happy with. Now, I want to make it several times to perfect it.

I used St. Louis-style pork spare ribs. You can use baby back ribs, but the St. Louis spares have a bit more meat on them typically, and I’ve often found in eating them from different places that they hold more of the smoke and rub flavors.

Without further delay, here’s my recipe.

Homemade Barbecue Rub

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/8 cup paprika

1/2 T salt

1/2 T pepper

1/2 T chili powder

1/2 T garlic powder

1/2 T onion powder

1/2 t cayenne

Barbecue Sauce

1/2 cup ketchup

1/3 cup honey

1 T Worcestershire sauce

1/4 t garlic salt

1/4 t pepper

Cooking Directions

  1. Prepare your ribs by removing the membrane on the bone side and the extra flap of meat hanging off. You can use a knife to get under the membrane and then a paper towel to help grip it and pull it off. Removing this piece will help your rub soak into both sides more thoroughly.
  2. Mix your barbecue dry rub together and then use your fingers to coat both sides of your rack of ribs in the rub. The general rule is that what sticks to the ribs is enough rub to use. Wrap your ribs in aluminum foil and let them sit for six hours or overnight.
  3. Cover an oven-safe pan (big enough for your ribs) with foil for easy cleanup. Unwrap your ribs and sit them on top of a cooking or cooling rack on top of the pan.
  4. Put your ribs uncovered in the oven on broil for a few minutes to help caramelize your dry rub coating.
  5. Reduce the temperature to 250 degrees and cook for two hours.
  6. Remove from oven and tent a piece of foil over the ribs, then put them back in the oven on the same temperature for two more hours.
  7. Mix your barbecue sauce, remove your ribs from the oven and use a basting brush to generously cover the ribs on the meat side.
  8. Reduce your oven temperature to 200 degrees and put your ribs back in the oven for 10 minutes.
  9. Repeat the saucing and cooking process as many times as desired to cook the sauce into the ribs.
  10. Use a sharp knife to cut your ribs into smaller racks or into individual ribs. Be sure to cut between the bones, not next to the bones. After the cooking time allotted, your ribs should be done, tender and pulling slightly away from the bones on the ends.


Matthew’s take: I had never made ribs, so I was a bit intimidated. No more fear after this first-time process. These ribs turned out delicious! The rub and sauce were both adaptations of recipes I found online, and I won’t change either of them moving forward. The rub would work great for chicken or other barbecued meats as well, and the sauce would go well with chicken, burgers and more! The ribs turned out meaty and tender, spiced to perfection by the rub and then sweetly sauced by the barbecue coating added at the end. If you don’t own a grill, prefer not to grill in the cooler months or just would rather cook in your oven, this is the recipe for you if you want to try ribs at home. They’ll be cheaper that way. My rack only cost me $7, while the rub and sauce were from ingredients already in our pantry and fridge, and we got four servings from the ribs. I give this recipe an A+ for taste, cost and presentation.

Molly’s take: Having never had homemade ribs before, I was blown away by this creation Matthew put together. I’m pretty sure once I started in on them, I didn’t stop until every last bite was picked clean off the bones. The ribs alone – with the seasoned rub – were smoky and flavorful, but the sauce really made the flavors pop. The honey in the sauce gives it a great sweet flavor which fits well with the smoky ribs. If you’re looking to try something new, this recipe is worth your time. I’ve never had homemade ribs, but I’ve had ribs at restaurants, and trust me, these are some of the best I’ve ever tasted.

Simple Slow Cooker Meals


The weather turns coldest in the South in the weeks after Christmas and New Year’s, coinciding with a time when most people seem to go into recovery mode from all of the intense cooking and eating during the holidays. That means it’s a perfect time to rely on a slow cooker to help prepare easy dinners to warm up on nights when the sun goes down early and the temperature drops quickly.

These are some of our very favorite slow cooker meals that are incredibly easy to prepare if you’re short on time, money or ideas. Each one will feed four people, give or take, so just modify the basic recipe to fit your needs.



Chili Beans

A hearty meat and bean chili with a touch of spice can really warm up a winter evening. You’ll need:

1 pound ground beef

1 can kidney beans

1 can chili beans

1 can diced tomatoes with green chilis

salt and pepper to taste

Brown your ground beef, and then mix all of your ingredients in your slow cooker. Set to high if you want your chili ready sooner, or cook on low if you plan to let it simmer for a while before eating. Since your ground beef is already cooked, you’re really just allowing time for the flavors to blend and heat. Also, because you’re using the tomatoes with green chilis, you’ll get a spicy kick without having to test out different seasoning combinations. You can add chili powder or other spices if you want, but we’ve found this recipe removes the need for them. The chili goes great with a piece of corny cornbread.



Beef Roast

A slow cooker roast produces a full meal without using a lot of dishes or time. All you need is a few minutes to chop your vegetables and six or seven hours to allow the meat to fully cook and the veggies to soften. For this dinner you’ll need:

a bottom round beef roast (we usually go for about 3 pounds)

raw carrots

white, red or yellow potatoes

raw onion

2 beef bouillon cubes

water to cover your ingredients

I like to start by placing the roast lengthwise in the slow cooker. Then I drop a bouillon cube on each end and surround everything with my chopped vegetables. (You can decide how much you want of each vegetable.) Finally, cover everything with water—to assure enough moisture for cooking everything in the pot—and cook on high for at least four or five hours. If you’re able to be around the house during cooking, you can then turn the slow cooker to low for a few hours to finish the job and prepare your dinner. If not, you might want to plan to cook on high for a slightly shorter period of time to ensure everything gets done.



Butter Beans

There’s something so “comfort food” about a bowl of Southern butter beans, especially when accompanied by a homemade biscuit or piece of cornbread. For the beans you’ll need:

2 cups dry large white lima beans

6 cups water to cover beans well

4 tablespoons of butter

Pieces of leftover meat to flavor

We like to add leftover country ham or ham steak, bacon or beef sausage to our butter beans for extra flavor. You can cook them on high for three hours or so, check to see if you need more water so the beans don’t dry out and then turn the slow cooker to low. (Unlike many recipes you’ll find online, we don’t recommend soaking the dry beans beforehand. Molly says she can’t tell a difference in the results – beans made this way are just as good and much easier!) You can also slow cook them on low for a longer period of time. The result is a pot of soft, buttery beans with a hint of whatever meat you’ve added to flavor them. Butter beans go great with a homemade biscuit. Additionally, Molly likes to mix a few spoons of Duke’s mayonnaise into her bowl for added flavor. I dissent on that practice and prefer my beans straight out of the slow cooker.



Cheesesteak Sandwiches

A slow cooker might not be the first option that comes to mind when you think about making a sandwich. But for the meat that goes in a cheesesteak sandwich, it’s the perfect and easiest option. You can’t really go wrong! You’ll need:

2 pounds top sirloin

provolone cheese

1 green pepper

½ sweet onion

salt, pepper, seasoning to taste


sandwich buns (your choice, we like sub style)

Slice your steak, pepper and onions into thin strips. You’ll need a sharp knife for the meat. Season the steak with salt and pepper as desired. We like to include beef bouillon cubes in our slow cooker for flavor, and then cover the meat, cubes and veggies with water. Cook six or seven hours. Once your steak has cooked, divide it evenly onto your sandwich buns. Cover your steak with the desired amount of cheese. Stick your cheesesteaks on a pan and melt the cheese in an oven or toaster oven. Serve your sandwiches with any side you choose. We prefer simple French fries or homemade potato wedges.

Fried Dressing, a Family Tradition


This special guest post is introduced by our cousin, Pam Upton Waters, of Rutherfordton, N.C. Her mom Betty Quinn Upton, our great aunt, started the fried dressing tradition years ago, and it’s a delicious meal staple we continue to enjoy today.

No holiday get-together would be complete without this treat.

People have asked for the recipe. My mother’s response is always the same. “I don’t have a recipe. I just put what looks right.”

“How do you know when it looks right?”

“I don’t know. I just know.”

Well, that is just as clear as mud to the rest of us. Anyway, several years ago we did put together a recipe of sorts for a friend. They loved it, so we use that one.


Aunt Betty with her fried dressing

The Recipe


  • One recipe each of biscuits and cornbread, all baked, cooled and crumbled.
  • Broth—enough to make the breadcrumbs moist, about ¾ to 1 cup or so.
  • Onion, finely chopped. Two handfuls, about 1 small to medium or half a medium to large.
  • Meat, finely chopped. One turkey or chicken leg will do. Liver, gizzard and wings can also be used.
  • Sausage seasoning to taste. We start with ½ teaspoon per cup of breadcrumbs and go from there. You can start with ¼ teaspoon or so with the dry ingredients because it mixes better then. Just remember you can add more as needed, but you can’t take it out if you add too much.
  • Oil for frying.


  • Mix the crumbs together.
  • Add onion and meat. Mix well.
  • Add broth slowly to moisten while mixing. Hands are best used here, although a spoon will work, too.
  • Add sausage seasoning. Taste to make sure it is the heat level you like. Watch who you let be the taste tester if you have a relative with no taste buds.
  • Continue adding broth and mixing until it’s soft like play dough.
  • Pat out portions about the size of hamburger patties.
  • Fry patties in a pan in a low layer of oil until brown on each side.
  • Serve warm with gravy.

Recipe by Betty Quinn Upton

Matthew’s Three-Ingredient Biscuits


I’ve enjoyed some fantastic homemade biscuits in my life. With no disrespect to other great biscuit makers in my family, my grandma Vember’s were the best. It must have been the grandma love she handed her biscuits, affectionately known as “hoppy toad” biscuits, presumably because they were small and so good they quickly hopped off the pan.

Recently, I’ve had her biscuits on my mind, and I’ve come to realize I’ll never make — or likely eat anywhere — biscuits like hers again. But I’ve had this nagging hankering for delicious homemade biscuits, and I’ve been on the hunt for a simple recipe that satisfies the craving when it hits.

My wife Molly makes delicious homemade biscuits that go great with a bacon-and-eggs breakfast, jam spreads or a drizzle of honey. But Molly will tell you that I have one complaint about those biscuits, mostly when I’m the one cooking them: I don’t like using shortening, also known as lard. It has an oilyness to it that just “burns my biscuits.” I don’t enjoy working in it with my hands, and I don’t enjoy cleaning the measuring cup that contains it. So, I’ve been searching for an ingredient replacement, and I think I’ve found it.

No one recipe has delivered exactly what I’m looking for, so I can tell you that this specific recipe is probably out there in some form, but I’ve created my own version of it as a mashup of pieces from others. The only required ingredients: Flour, Milk and Butter. Be patient with these biscuits. You’ll have to try them several times to arrive at just the right combination for your taste and your oven. And when you do, I expect you’ll be quite pleased.

These biscuits offer light, flaky layers and a savory, buttery taste to boot. They make great biscuits for sandwiching toppings like bacon, sausage and eggs. They’re great with jelly. I even love eating them plain, and because of the butter included in the recipe, there’s little need for slathering extra butter when they come out of the oven. See what you think, and let me know if you like them as much as I’ve come to.



2 Cups Self-Rising Flour

1/2 Cup Unsalted Butter (one stick, and it doesn’t actually have to be unsalted)

1/3 Cup Milk (you might have to test out this amount, depending on the consistency of your dough)

Yield: About 10 Biscuits


1. Cut your cold butter into cubes and toss them into your flour in a medium to large mixing bowl.

2. Use your hands, a pastry cutter or two forks to fold your butter into your flour.

3. Once your butter and flour are mixed, incorporate the milk slowly, until all three ingredients are blended well. You may need extra milk if your mixture is too dry, but you don’t want it to become too sticky either.

4. Form your dough into a large ball. Flour a flat surface and the outside of the ball.

5. Roll out your dough on the flat surface, then fold the dough over on itself and roll it out again. Repeat as many times as you like for more layers in your biscuit. You’ll see how many layers you want after your first time baking these biscuits. If you don’t want layers, roll out and don’t fold the dough.

6. Roll the dough to about an inch thick for thicker biscuits, or about a half inch for thinner biscuits.

7. Use a biscuit cutter or a circular cup to cut your biscuits. Flour the rim to keep from sticking. (You can also parcel out the dough in little balls and then flatten and form with your hands. I like a cutter to keep the biscuits more uniform in size.)

8. Place your biscuits on an ungreased baking sheet (You have butter in your biscuits to help with sticking).

9. (Optional) You can brush the tops of your biscuits with melted butter before putting them in the oven or midway through cooking for browner tops and an extra buttery flavor and texture.

10. Cook in a 450-degree oven for eight to 10 minutes, depending on the desired doneness.

More #FoodieScore Biscuits: Molly’s Three-Ingredient Biscuits

Corny Cornbread

Corny Cornbread

Cornbread has occupied a regular spot on Southern dinner tables for centuries now. It’s normally an inexpensive bready staple that’s traditionally been bred to crackle and crumble its way into soupy sides like beans and potatoes. While there’s incredible satisfaction in using many iterations of cornbread to add flavor and texture to a plate, or to help clean the plate itself at the end of a meal, cornbread can be so much more.

I learned how to easily take cornbread to another level while visiting in the kitchen with an old friend, Martha Hall, during my days living in North Carolina’s colonial capital, New Bern. Martha made a more delicious cornbread that paired great with homemade chili beans. She called it “Corny Cornbread.”

While at first it sounds quite redundant, let’s think about the name. Most cornbread I’ve eaten includes the “corn” part more because of the cornmeal than actual kernels. Not so with Corny Cornbread. Kernels are baked right in, hence the “Corny part,” and the result is an extra burst of flavor and texture in each and every bite.

Perhaps even more importantly there’s one extra ingredient that gives this higher breed of bread an edge over its crumbly ancestors, and that’s sour cream. The dish could just as easily be called “Creamy Corny Cornbread,” because this method makes a cornbread so buttery and non-crumbly that you almost don’t recognize it as, well, cornbread. (In fact, cornbread purists will scoff at it entirely. And that’s fine. I like a creative kitchen where new concepts are embraced. You aren’t required to do the same.)

So, how is this Corny Cornbread assembled? Well, I’ll take liberties with Martha’s recipe by adding my own twist. I suggest you start with whatever cornbread recipe you prefer. You can mix from scratch with cornmeal, or you can do what we like in our house: Use a box of Jiffy. We love Jiffy’s sweetness and simplicity, so we start with the mix, needing only to add a third of a cup of milk and one egg. Then, you can add one cup of whole kernel corn (fresh is, of course, is the very best, and you can actually use cream corn if you really want to be bold, but you might need to alter the cooking time and methods due to the extra soupiness), and be sure to include a third of a cup of sour cream. Blend all of that together and pour into your cast iron skillet or baking dish and follow the time and temperature instructions of your recipe.

As usual, I suggest you take liberties with this #FoodieScore recipe, ensuring you create a plate to suit your tastes and make you happy. And as always, be sure to let us know what you think of your Corny Cornbread. Thank you, Martha Hall, for making cornbread cornier and better than ever. We believe these tricks can take cornbread quite literally from a side dish to the star of your meal.