Simple Dark Chocolate Hummus Dip

Dark Chocolate Hummus

Who doesn’t like to snack? Even if you eat filling meals, there are times when you crave a little something to keep you from fighting intense hunger until the next one. Growing up in our Southern home we called snacks or small meals something to “tide us over.”

Sometimes we desire something salty like a chip or cracker. Other times we want something sweet like a cookie. Well, I have good news. This recipe can offer a little bit of both.

There are many ways to make hummus, but you typically need a few basic ingredients to start, regardless of your intended final product of savory or sweet. Most folks begin with chickpeas (also called garbanzo beans) and tahini, a nutty, buttery, pasty substance that helps provide a lot of the smoothness we enjoy in hummus.

Tahini isn’t the easiest ingredient to find in all our local grocery stores. The one place I did find it, a small jar was $7, not friendly to my constant-cooking budget. I couldn’t justify it. So, I did a little research on some favorite fellow food blogs and discovered peanut butter is an acceptable substitute for tahini in a hummus recipe. It also fits perfectly in this particular version because the point is to create a slightly sweet and very cocoa-chocolatey treat. Otherwise, I kept the recipe on course with others I found, with just a few slight modifications.

NOTE: Many cooks even argue you should call such a mixture a “spread” because hummus, they say, actually translates quite literally to ground chickpeas. I disagree, opting for the western world definition of hummus that includes all the mixture’s ingredients.

You can serve this hummus with most plain crackers (i.e. butter or saltine), pretzels, a plain cookie (such as a vanilla wafer) or with fruit (most common, strawberries or apple slices). And other than adding the calories for those accompaniments, it’s pretty healthy at just 55 calories and 2 grams of sugar per 1/4 cup.

Dark Chocolate Hummus


1 15-ounce can chickpeas

1/2 cup cocoa powder

1/4 cup peanut butter

1/4 cup maple syrup

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/4 teaspoon salt

4 tablespoons water



1. Drain the chickpeas.

2. Puree the chickpeas, peanut butter, syrup, cocoa, vanilla, salt and 2 tablespoons of the water in a food processor for about 30 seconds. Scrape down the bowl.

3. Add more syrup if you want a sweeter mixture, but be advised that the bitterness will subside just a bit once you chill the hummus in the fridge. It will still be a bit bitter like dark chocolate, however.

4. Add another 2 tablespoons of water and puree again, about a minute or two, until you get a creamy consistency.

5. Store in the fridge in an air-tight container for up to 10 days. You’ll have about 5 cups of hummus total, enough for 10 half-cup servings or 20 quarter-cup servings.

Gluten-Free Roasted Chickpeas

Roasted Chick Peas

Most all of us like to snack from time to time (or all the time). Problem is, much of what we eat between meals tends to have no nutritional value at all, but it has tons of fat, salt or sugar.

If you’re prone to reaching for chips, crackers or other high-calorie, low-benefit salty snacks, try these Roasted Chickpeas. They’ve got the crunch and nuttiness of a peanut, while also having the texture and similar flavor to a sunflower seed. You can season them in various ways, or you can keep them plain for a more natural flavor and no-salt version.

The best part is, you get the perception of a crunchy, fried snack food without much of the negative result of something like a bag of chips. And they’re gluten free!

Roasted Chickpeas


1 can chickpeas (also called garbanzo beans)

2 Tablespoons olive oil

garlic salt, optional, to taste

cayenne pepper, optional, to taste


1. The most important step is to drain your chickpeas. Start by removing the water with a colander. Then take a kitchen towel or paper towel(s) and pat the peas dry. You want to remove all the moisture possible to help them develop a crunch in the oven.

2. Toss the chickpeas with the olive oil in a medium bowl. Add garlic salt or just regular salt, if desired.

3. Bake the chickpeas in a pan in a 350-degree oven for about 50 minutes. Your baking time will vary depending on the oven.  Be sure to watch the peas after they’ve been cooking for a while to ensure they don’t brown too much or burn.

4. Remove the peas and return them to a medium bowl, but not the olive oil bowl if you haven’t washed and dried it. Season with cayenne pepper or another spice and toss before serving.

5. Store in a cool, dry place (but not the fridge) in an enclosed container to maintain freshness and crunch for several days.

Molly’s Homemade Flour Tortillas


A great tortilla is the cornerstone of a great taco, burrito, enchilada or torta. There’s nothing wrong with the tortillas you purchase in a bag in the grocery store. In fact, you can even freshen those pre-made tortillas by wrapping them in a damp paper towel in your microwave. But tortillas can be even better if you make them from scratch at home.

I’ve always enjoyed a soft taco, dating back to my first cooking experiences as a teenager, when I’d make myself basic stovetop fajitas in flour tortillas at home. So when I learned several years ago that my wife-to-be Molly made homemade tortillas, I was quite excited. When I saw how inexpensive the ingredients are, well, I was even more excited.

These tortillas often cook up a little thicker than what you might buy off the store shelves. So they might even remind you a bit of pita bread, which to me just means they serve extra purpose. I believe your product is the result of the kind of tortilla flour you use and the method by which you flatten them for cooking. However you do it, I guarantee you they’ll become the basis for special taco nights in your house, as they have in ours.

For Molly’s Homemade Flour Tortillas you’ll need:

2 cups tortilla flour

2/3 cup water

Put the tortilla flour in a large bowl. Slowly add the water, mixing in with your hands until fully incorporated. Form into a large ball until all the flour is absorbed. Cover the bowl with a damp kitchen towel and let the dough rise for 5 minutes.

Tear off and form small balls, slightly bigger than the size of a golf ball, and place them on a floured surface. You should end up with about 9 dough balls. Take each ball and roll them out with a rolling pin to about an eighth of an inch thick.

Heat a cast iron skillet to medium and cook each tortilla until lightly toasted on each side. Watch them carefully. You may want to use a fork or other utensil to flip the tortillas since they will be hot. And you may need to flip each tortilla a few times to get it just right. Practice makes perfect!

You can stack them on a plate or place them in a tortilla warmer until ready to use. It’s as simple as that!

Fried Dressing, a Family Tradition


This special guest post is introduced by our cousin, Pam Upton Waters, of Rutherfordton, N.C. Her mom Betty Quinn Upton, our great aunt, started the fried dressing tradition years ago, and it’s a delicious meal staple we continue to enjoy today.

No holiday get-together would be complete without this treat.

People have asked for the recipe. My mother’s response is always the same. “I don’t have a recipe. I just put what looks right.”

“How do you know when it looks right?”

“I don’t know. I just know.”

Well, that is just as clear as mud to the rest of us. Anyway, several years ago we did put together a recipe of sorts for a friend. They loved it, so we use that one.


Aunt Betty with her fried dressing

The Recipe


  • One recipe each of biscuits and cornbread, all baked, cooled and crumbled.
  • Broth—enough to make the breadcrumbs moist, about ¾ to 1 cup or so.
  • Onion, finely chopped. Two handfuls, about 1 small to medium or half a medium to large.
  • Meat, finely chopped. One turkey or chicken leg will do. Liver, gizzard and wings can also be used.
  • Sausage seasoning to taste. We start with ½ teaspoon per cup of breadcrumbs and go from there. You can start with ¼ teaspoon or so with the dry ingredients because it mixes better then. Just remember you can add more as needed, but you can’t take it out if you add too much.
  • Oil for frying.


  • Mix the crumbs together.
  • Add onion and meat. Mix well.
  • Add broth slowly to moisten while mixing. Hands are best used here, although a spoon will work, too.
  • Add sausage seasoning. Taste to make sure it is the heat level you like. Watch who you let be the taste tester if you have a relative with no taste buds.
  • Continue adding broth and mixing until it’s soft like play dough.
  • Pat out portions about the size of hamburger patties.
  • Fry patties in a pan in a low layer of oil until brown on each side.
  • Serve warm with gravy.

Recipe by Betty Quinn Upton

Time-Honored Christmas Treats Our Family Loves


In this special guest post, #FoodieScore blogger Matthew Tessnear’s mom, Chris Tessnear, recalls the inspirations for the holiday goodies she makes each Christmas season and shares the recipe for a favorite family tradition. Discover her blog, where faith and art unite, at

Celebrations in the South always involve food, and Christmas in the South means special food and treats. Growing up I remember my mom’s orange cake made with oranges from the treat bags received from the textile mill where my dad worked. I also remember my grandmother’s sweet potato pie. She, like my mom, made biscuit dough for pie crust as well. She added very little to her cooked sweet potatoes, and the pie was very thin (not deep dish). She put mini marshmallows on top and ran them under the broiler to melt and brown. I could go on, but I think I’m supposed to share some of the treats I make.

Like my mom and grandmother, I picked up ideas from other places over the years. My Nutty Fingers I first learned to make in Home Economics in the Seventies. The White Chocolate Peanut Butter Ritz crackers (never found a short title) was learned when dad brought some home the girls in the office made at work. Back then, we used real white chocolate and added paraffin to the mix for easier flow and gloss. This was in the early Eighties. I guess we had not learned about Almond Bark yet.

IMG_4917 (1)

The Spinach Balls I make came from a former pastor’s wife, Ann Dodd. They are easy and a little healthier than most holiday treats. Peanut Butter Fantasy Fudge was always mom’s favorite. I made it more often than Christmas.

I always make good old slice-and-bake sugar cookies. It’s hard to improve on that. I make traditional Party Mix but often use the store brand cereals. Homemade Sausage Balls are a staple each year. The once handmade Cheese Ball is now bought to save time.

One of my family’s favorites is my homemade Oatmeal Cakes, similar to a familiar purchased kind and sometimes called Little Chrissy Cakes. I developed these from a recipe I already hadI made them once and it became a tradition. I made them for a church fall festival and everyone wanted the recipe.

I’ll share that recipe here.


Little Chrissy Cakes (Homemade Oatmeal Cream Pies)


1 1/4 cup unsifted all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup soft butter or margarine

1/4 cup sugar

3/4 cup dark brown sugar

1 package instant vanilla pudding mix

2 eggs

3 1/2 cups oats

Combine butter, sugars, pudding mix in a bowl. Beat until creamy. Add eggs and mix. Gradually add flour mixed with baking soda. Stir in oats. Roll into 2-inch diameter log and chill. (Can be frozen up to one month).

When ready to bake, slice log into 1/4-inch slices and place on lightly sprayed cookie sheet. Bake at 350 degrees for 10 to 12 minutes until lightly browned. We like ours a little chewy, and 10 minutes is usually enough. Cool on wire rack, then add filling and wrap individually.


1 pound of confectioners’ sugar

1/2 cup softened butter

1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla

Cream butter and add sugar slowly, then beat until smooth and creamy. Add vanilla and mix well. Spread a good amount in between two cookies. (I admit to using canned icing mostly now. It’s all about enjoying the cookie soon and not being worn out by Christmas Day.

Yields about 18 cakes depending on the size of the cookies.

Food and Christmas go together. Traditions are important, especially at the holidays. Here’s to wishing you a wonderful Christmas filled with all the tasty hope of the season.